Friday, October 12, 2018 - 09:36 • Sophie Yeo

The rig standing in a field in Little Plumpton, Lancashire, is about to start drilling. Today, Cuadrilla finally got all the all-clear to start fracking, after the High Court rejected a request for a last-minute injunction.

Activists stationed outside the site have been disrupting Cuadrilla’s plans for over a year. They’ve used lock-ons and legal challenges to obstruct the company’s plans, but it looks as though Cuadrilla has leapt the final hurdle.

None of the protesters are about to go home. They see this as a legal hiccup on a longer road to victory.

Monday, October 8, 2018 - 02:28 • Mat Hope
Read time: 3 mins

The government’s proposal to change planning rules to make it easier to frack the UK is an “insult to local democracy”, campaigners say.

Around 20 protestors gathered to erect a four-meter fracking rig outside the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) to protest against plans to make fracking sites “permitted developments”. Under the plans, fracking sites would be able to automatically proceed, rather than having to receive consent from local authorities.

The protest took place on the day the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a report outlining the benefits of limiting warming to 1.5C above pre-industrial levels, and suggesting a rapid phasing out of fossil fuels was necessary to achieve the goal.

Sunday, October 7, 2018 - 18:00 • Mat Hope
Read time: 6 mins

The scientists are clear: “rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society” are needed if the humans are going to prevent the world warming by more than 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels.

This news — emanating from the release of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) mammoth new special report —  comes as a surprise to almost no-one. Least of all the fossil fuel industry, which has known for decades that the carbon budget that keeps that goal within reach has been rapidly depleting thanks to its products.

Sunday, October 7, 2018 - 17:52 • Graham Readfearn
Read time: 5 mins

There is no scenario to keep global warming to 1.5°C (2.7°F) that allows coal to be burned for electricity by the middle of this century, a major United Nations (UN) climate report says.

The UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report concludes human-caused greenhouse gas emissions have already pushed global average temperatures up by 1°C since the second half of the 19th century.

Warming is higher than the 1°C average over land, with temperatures as much as three times higher in the Arctic, causing melting. Extreme temperatures, rainfall, and sea levels have been pushed higher.

Massive and rapid transformations across societies will be needed to keep to a 1.5°C target, with dramatic cuts to fossil fuel use across all sectors of society.

Saturday, October 6, 2018 - 01:38 • Guest
Read time: 3 mins

By Calum Thomas, sustainable transport and anti-aviation campaigner

Yesterday afternoon it was announced by a judge that five legal challenges to a third runway at Heathrow would be heard formally in court next March. This is significant because, had the judge ruled otherwise, this could have been an unceremonious end to official channels of opposition.

The courts are the final institutional check on our government’s decision to expand aviation in the U.K. As campaigners, we believe the idea of expanding airports, in full knowledge of the local social and health impacts, as well as the devastating human consequences of climate breakdown, is maniacal in its disregard for people and its lack of humanity.

Friday, October 5, 2018 - 05:52 • Olga Dobrovidova
Read time: 3 mins

Russia’s President Vladimir Putin believes US President Donald Trump is open to international cooperation on climate change beyond the Paris Agreement so long as the global community does “not antagonise the relationship with the US”. Putin echoed Trump’s climate science denial, however, saying the reasons for global warming were “not entirely clear”.

Speaking at a major energy conference in Moscow, Putin told the audience:

Without [the US] it would be impossible to reduce the influence of anthropogenic air pollution on the global climate even a little bit. Therefore, one way or another we need to involve the US in this discussion and this joint work.”

Thursday, October 4, 2018 - 23:34 • Mat Hope
Read time: 4 mins

The Science Museum continues to pursue a close relationship with fossil fuel companies despite campaigners’ repeated calls for the companies to be dropped as sponsor due to their contribution to climate change, emails obtained through a freedom of information request reveal.

The disclosure, obtained by campaign group Culture Unstained, comes two weeks before the start of Manchester Science Festival, where Shell is controversially sponsoring an exhibition. A low carbon NGO has already cut ties with the festival in protest at the deal.

Wednesday, October 3, 2018 - 08:09 • Chloe Farand
Read time: 5 mins

A London-based mining company accused of extensive human rights abuse and environmental damage in India has delisted from the London Stock Exchange amidst concerns it is seeking to escape public scrutiny.

Vedanta Resources Plc delisted from the London market on Monday amidst strong accusations by protesters that the company was “fleeing” the stock exchange without being held accountable by the regulatory authorities for “corporate massacres” .

Vedanta made headlines earlier this year after 13 protesters demanding the shutdown of India’s second largest copper plant in the southern state of Tamil Nadu were shot dead by police and dozens were injured.

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