Statoil

Mapped: Cambridge Analytica’s Ties to the Fossil Fuel Industry

Read time: 3 mins
Network map

Revelations continue to emerge about Cambridge Analytica, a political consultancy that has found itself embroiled in a scandal around data privacy and electoral manipulation.

Three whistleblowers have gone public in the Guardian and Observer to outline how Cambridge Analytica used Facebook data to influence the outcomes of the US presidential election and Brexit referendum.

DeSmog UK has previously mapped how the company ties to climate science denial through its Brexit and Trump connections. Now, Nafeez Ahmed over at Motherboard has outlined how Cambridge Analytica has ties to the fossil fuel industry.

Statoil Drops 'Oil' From its Name, But Not its Business Model

Read time: 4 mins
Statoil oil rig

Norwegian energy giant Statoil has announced it is rebranding to ‘Equinor’, a new name the firm states is inspired by “words like equal, equality and equilibrium”, as well as “Nor” for Norway.

But is this just an exercise in greenwashing? Just how fair and equitable is the company’s strategy?

After all, Statoil remains, at heart, a fossil fuel company.

Oil and Gas Climate Initiative

The Oil and Gas Climate Initiative (OGCI)

Background

The Oil and Gas Climate Initiative (OGCI) is a coalition of major oil and gas companies created to promote a climate-friendly image for some of the world’s largest polluters.

Read time: 8 mins

BP, Exxon, Shell Get £500 Million Taxpayer Handout Despite Climate Risks of North Sea Drilling

Read time: 3 mins
North Sea oil rig

UK taxpayers handed big oil companies more than £500 million in 2015, according to new government data.

Analysts say about two-thirds of known fossil fuel resources must remain in the ground if the world is going to hit its climate targets. But the UK government has a generous subsidy system to encourage companies to “maximise economic recovery” in the North Sea.

This is despite falling oil prices and the growth of alternative energy sources, which means the industry contributes increasingly little to the UK economy.

According to new data from the government’s Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative report, BP made around £221 million from taxpayers in 2015.

Oil Giants Declare Climate Leadership, Immediately Find New Places to Drill

Read time: 4 mins
Offshore oil rigs in a row

Oil giants Shell, Statoil and BP have been awarded exploration licenses for new areas of the North Sea, just weeks after declaring their commitment to tackling climate change.

The UK Oil and Gas Authority (OGA) awarded 25 licenses as part of its 29th licensing round. The 29th round was the first to focus on under-explored ‘frontier’ areas around Rockall Basin, the mid-North Sea and around East Shetland. 

Statoil received six licences to explore around East Shetland. Five licences were awarded in partnership with BP, and one in partnership with ExxonMobil.

Shell was also awarded two licences, partnering with BP for one.

Have Oil Majors Changed Their Tune on Climate Change?

Read time: 6 mins
Oil rig by wind turbines

This is the biggest challenge as we have at the moment as a company,” Ben van Beurden, chief executive of oil giant Shell, said recently. “The fact that societal acceptance of the energy system as we have it is just disappearing.”

Speaking at the annual CERAWeek energy conference in Houston on March 9, van Beurden described the growing tensions between his industry, which has created our fossil fuel dependent energy system, and the public, which is demanding a switch to clean energy: “I do think trust has been eroded to the point where it starts to become a serious issue for our long-term future.”

The world’s largest oil companies are increasingly faced with public pressure to do something about their impact on climate change. And increasingly we’re seeing their chief executives responding. The question is though, how much is for real and what's just greenwash?

Statoil Claims to Care About Climate Change, Commits Future to Oil and Gas

Read time: 3 mins
Statoil logo and sculpture

Big oil company Statoil yesterday released its ‘climate roadmap’. It said the plan “will further strengthen Statoil’s industry leadership in climate performance”.

A closer look shows that Statoil — a major player in the UK’s North Sea oil and gas industry — doesn’t plan to change much, however. The Norwegian oil company plans to still be a big oil and gas company decades from now, ignoring  warnings that its carbon bubble may burst as the world moves away from fossil fuels to cut emissions and tackle climate change.

In a five minute video accompanying the roadmap’s launch, Bjørn Otto Sverdrup, Statoil's senior vice president for sustainability, said “it is very important for energy companies to take a stand and help to contribute to reduce emissions”.

Mapped: How Fracking Lobbyists From the UK and America Have Infiltrated Parliament

Read time: 10 mins

Fracking companies are donating hundreds of thousands of pounds to a select group of UK MPs and Lords, parliamentary data reveals.

The contributions give the shale gas industry privileged access to lawmakers, and allows companies to promote their interests inside parliament.

Companies directly involved in the shale gas industry donated around £130,000 in funds or benefits in kind to the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Unconventional Oil and Gas in 2016, registry data shows.

Many of these companies are currently in the early stages of exploring for shale gas in the UK. Others are large US and multinational companies heavily involved in America’s fracking boom, which may be eyeing up UK investment opportunities if the conditions are right.

DeSmog UK has mapped the key connections between donors to the APPG, and Britain and America’s corporate fracking interests.

Canada’s Costly Oilsands Loses Another Player as Norwegian Oil Giant Statoil Pulls Out

Read time: 2 mins
Statoil's oil sands operations

Norwegian oil major Statoil will be pulling out of its Canadian oilsands project after nearly a decade with an expected loss of at least USD$500 million.

In yet another sign that Canada’s oilsands – one of the most polluting fossil fuel projects on the planet – is becoming increasingly costly, Lars Christian Bacher, Statoil’s executive vice-president for international development and production, said in a statement: “This transaction corresponds with Statoil’s strategy of portfolio optimisation to enhance financial flexibility and focus capital on core activities globally.”

The 14 December announcement comes just weeks after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau approved the controversial Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline and the Enbridge Line 3 pipeline in a move to facilitate growth in the oilsands and create jobs.

Big Oil Argues Gas, Not Electricity, Will Be ‘Destination Fuel’ For Transport

Read time: 4 mins
traffic

When it comes to transport, liquefied natural gas (LNG) will be a destination fuel rather than a bridge to renewables-generated electricity, said oil representatives speaking at the Economist’s annual Energy Summit in London.

The claim mirrors the recent COP22 climate pledge by oil giants to invest in gas as a 'climate friendly' fuel.

We’ve talked a lot about gas being the bridge, but in heavy transport, in shipping, in trucking, LNG could be the destination fuel, not the bridge fuel,” said Steve Hill Executive Vice President for Gas and Energy Markets at Shell.

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